The Wondrous Capabilities of Trees

Mar 11, 2022 | Benefits of Trees, People who inspire, Tree Matters

”Without trees, we could not survive. Trees lay the path for the human soul.”

Canadian botanist, biochemist and visionary Diana Beresford-Kroeger’s startling insights into the hidden life of trees have already sparked a quiet revolution in how we understand our relationship to forests.

Now, in a captivating account of how her life led her to these illuminating and crucial ideas, she shows us how forests can not only heal us but save the planet.

This book is not only the story of a remarkable scientist and her ideas, it harvests all of her powerful knowledge about why trees matter, and why trees are a viable, achievable solution to climate change.
Diana eloquently shows us that if we can understand the intricate ways in which the health and welfare of every living creature is connected to the global forest, and strengthen those connections, we will still have time to mend the self-destructive ways that are leading to drastic fires, droughts and floods.

Diana has been working to preserve the environment since the early 1960s when she identified climate change as one of the most important challenges we would face in the modern age.

This set her on a course of rigorous scientific study where she achieved a masters in botany and two PHD’s – one in biochemistry and the other in biology.
In 1967 she discovered genetic smearing, which changed the way scientists studied microcosms under a microscope. Diana also discovered cathodoluminescense in biological systems, which is now used to detect cancer.

But because of her Celtic roots her heart was always with the forest. Diana’s understanding of the ancient knowledge of trees has led her to unique scientific discoveries.

In the 1970s Diana started her own arboretum and collected trees from all over the world.
She discovered the importance of mother trees at the heart of the forest and she scientifically proved that trees are a living library of medicine that have a chemical language and communicate in a quantum world.

Diana’s documentary, “Call of the Forest’’ was released in 2016 and alongside it was a tree-planting app “which keyed species to plant to the regions where people lived.”

She created an ambitious bioplan encouraging and educating ordinary people how to replant the global forest.This plan was adopted by the city of Ottawa.

Diana’s Bioplan is an ambitious plan encouraging ordinary people to develop a new relationship with nature, to join together to replant the global forest.

All things are connected on planet Earth, from the burning eye of the volcano and the brilliant colours of a butterfly’s wing, to the chlorophyll of plants and life within the seas. In recent years the tapestry of life has been damaged.

The Bioplan is the tool to mend the holes in the fabric – so that forests will be planted, the seas will have fish and marine life, the air will have more oxygen and less carbon dioxide.
This is the pledge of mankind to share this planet because it is our divine contract to ourselves and to all others.

This book is not only the story of a remarkable scientist and her ideas, it harvests all of her powerful knowledge about why trees matter, and why trees are a viable, achievable solution to climate change.

Diana eloquently shows us that if we can understand the intricate ways in which the health and welfare of every living creature is connected to the global forest, and strengthen those connections, we will still have time to mend the self-destructive ways that are leading to drastic fires, droughts and floods.

Praise for To Speak for the Trees …

WINNER OF THE 2019 SIGURD F. OLSON NATURE WRITING AWARD

“A leading scientist comes . . . with a simple and hopeful message about how to reverse the effects of climate change: plant more trees. . . . She would know. Beresford-Kroeger has a PhD in medical microbiology and botany.
She’s published six books on trees and forests, and was the driving force behind the documentary Call of the Forest: The Forgotten Wisdom of Trees.
She is a member of the Royal Geographical Society, which named her one of twenty-five women explorers of Canada. She is also among the Utne Reader’s World Visionaries. . . .
Her memoir and speaking tour are timely. . . . Beresford-Kroeger said reaction to her memoir is ‘extraordinary.’ Readers have sent letters and called her after reading the book.
It has been likened to Silent Spring by Rachel Carson and Small Is Beautiful: A Study of Economics as if People Mattered by E.F. Schumacher.”
Waterloo Region Record

“In her youth in Ireland Diana Beresford-Kroeger received an extraordinary and unique education in traditional Celtic plant lore.
At university in Canada she specialized in biochemistry and merged what she learned and observed into her signature studies of trees, augmented by First Nation forest wisdom.
This autobiography of learning ways to heal the damaged earth and break the tightening grip of climate crisis offers a rational and inclusive way to keep our future.”
Annie Proulx, author of The Shipping News