Tree Alert

Tree Alert procedure

  • Introduce yourself to the contractor who is pruning or cutting the tree – indicate your interest
  • Establish who has contracted him and ask to see the permit from Recreation & Parks – all work on trees in public areas must have a permit
  • If no permit can be produced, ask him to stop work until he can show it
  • Obtain the contractor’s name and take photos of him and vehicle, the tree being pruned or felled, and the entrance gate of the house with street number
  • Send pictures to Neil.Fortes@capetown.gov.za and TreeKeepers and ask whether a permit was granted and for what reasons
  • If no reply is received within two days, follow up.

 

Emergency procedure

As per procedure above but also phone Neil Fortes on 082 561 3619 or Johan Herholdt on 021 4444 1692 or 084629 3257.  Also phone Claire Burgess on 082 546 7938.

 

City of Cape Town Tree Management Policy

Management of trees on City-owned land
When is it the responsibility of the City to prune, maintain or remove trees?

Trees play a pivotal role in improving the aesthetics of properties, public open spaces, road reserves and verges but quite often residents are unsure when it is the responsibility of the City to prune, maintain or remove trees.

The City’s Tree Management Policy, approved by full Council recently, addresses tree management in Cape Town’s changing social, legislative and environmental context.

The aim of the City’s Tree Management Policy is to provide a uniform approach to the management of trees on City-owned land across the city.

This excludes the management of trees that grow on private properties unless the tree impacts on public spaces. The policy takes into account the selection of appropriate species for the urban environment, careful selection of appropriate planting locations, the conditions for the removal of trees, tree planting, tree pruning, removal, tree protection and maintenance.

The City Parks Department is responsible for tree management and this includes avenue planting, cluster planting, historic trees and streetscapes. The City recognises that streets are public spaces where residents engage and interact and are not used purely for vehicle mobility. Therefore landscaping, particularly tree cover, is an important element of streetscaping that helps to build social cohesion among communities,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Community Services and Special Projects, Alderman Belinda Walker.

The City is responsible for choosing new trees with care and planting them subject to available space and the anticipated size of the mature tree. New tree planting can take place when developers, residents or other parties request that trees be planted within their municipal area on City land. Preference will be given to local indigenous trees but exotic species that are non-invasive and suited to local conditions are not excluded.

Should trees be damaged as a result of vandalism, lightning, or by the impact of human activity, replacement planting or blanking will be done. Replacement planting can also be done when existing streetscapes or avenues of trees start to age and new trees are inter-planted to prevent a negative impact on the aesthetic view.

‘Residents can apply to the City Parks Department for trees to be planted on sidewalks or verges in residential areas. This will, however, be dependent upon the availability of funds and suitable trees. One of the conditions for such requests will be the shared responsibility for the upkeep of the trees. Owners of adjacent properties must undertake to water the trees until they become established, while the City Parks Department will be responsible for the pruning of the trees when required,’ said Alderman Walker.

The pruning and removal of trees on City land will be done by the City Parks Department or an appointed service provider and will be dependent on a number of factors. Requests for pruning or removal must be directed to the local City Parks area office.

The policy also makes provision for champion trees, i.e. trees that are of exceptional importance and deserve national protection as a result of their remarkable size and age as well as their aesthetic, cultural, historic and tourism value. Such trees are protected by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Champion Trees Project.

‘Trees not only create a sense of place, but also enhance the social and public environment. They help to reduce our carbon footprint, change roadways into scenic drives, and become symbols of city landscapes,’ added Alderman Walker. 

For full details of the City’s policy refer to: http://treekeeperscapetown.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/City-TreeManagementPolicy2014.pdf

Tree pruners

TreeKeepers recommend that you consult and use qualified arborists for all tree pruning and felling. The following are active in the Southern Suburbs:

Riaan van Zyl Email: office@treedoc.co.za Phone: + 27 (0) 21 886 9767 Address: Stellenbosch, Western Cape (riaan@treedoc.co.za)

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Francois Krige Tel: 021 447 1369 krigetrees@gmail.com  Francois +27 82 658 0427

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Willem Avenant +27 72 434 2126 info@treespecialist.co.zahttp://www.treespecialist.co.za

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McKirdy & Son Aleck 083 458 5410 Chris 061 468 8640 aleckmckirdy@gmail.com

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Nick Pringuer www.affordafell.co.zaCell: 083 564 2048 Tel: 021 797 2366 Email: nick@affordafell.co.za